Archangel Errant

BOOK 1: Oracle of Philadelphia by Elizabeth Corrigan

BOOK 2: Raising Chaos

Archangel Errant  description:

Divine intervention isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

Gabriel didn’t expect his return to Heaven to be filled with trumpets and celebration, but he thought he would do more than sit at Michael’s side, listening to endless catalogs of unfulfilled prayers. He’s tried blending into every aspect of Heavenly life, but he can’t help but feel that the constantly praying Faithful and flower-dispensing Handmaidens lack the motivation to do any true good in the world. Some days, he longs for nothing more than to return to Earth and tell his beloved Cassia how he feels about her.

When Heaven is suddenly attacked, all the angels become trapped in their own nightmares. With Michael gone on an angelic mission, Gabriel must rally the remaining seraphim to rouse the sleeping angels and discover who seeks to take the agents of Heaven out of the celestial battle. All fingers point to Bedlam, but Gabriel can’t believe the ex-demon would threaten his salvation so soon after gaining it.

With few people he trusts, Gabriel must rely on all the lessons he learned on Earth to save Heaven, Bedlam, and maybe even himself.

BOOK 3: Archangel Errant  3 STARS

I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and it was an interesting insight into the purpose of the angels. What they care for and what they feared. Oddly enough, considering what the series is about, this is the first book that actually dealt with the religion itself. The previous had been more about the stories and what really happened, but this one delved into whether or not God is real and the faith of the people. However, the real thing that moves the story is the moments between Michael and Khet. More than anything, it was finally getting to see why Michael acts the way he does, and why he hates Khet. Yet, even as I enjoyed it, this book read like one of those episodes of a show that is nothing but flashbacks of how everyone met each other. It allows you to better understand the characters, and it was at least new information, but it left the plot itself rather thin and slow to move along. What bothered me the most though, was we never find out why Khet went to that hospital. It’s a loose thread, and I feel like Michael being driven mad because it wasn’t pulled in with the rest of the weave. Paltry complaints aside, it was still a good story and works well as a possible set up for the next in the series, which really needs to come out soon.

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Raising Chaos

BOOK 1: Oracle of Philadelphia by Elizabeth Corrigan

Raising Chaos   description:

When good fails, chaos rises to the challenge.

The daily life of a chaos demon is delightfully sinful—overindulging in Sri Lankan delicacies, trespassing on private beaches in Hawaii, and getting soused at the best angel bar on the planet. But when Bedlam learns that the archdemon Azrael has escaped from the Abyss in order to wreak vengeance against the person who sent her there—Bedlam’s best friend, Khet—he can’t sit idly by.

Only one relic possesses the power to kill Khet, who suffers immortality at Lucifer’s request: the mythical Spear of Destiny, which pierced Christ’s side at His crucifixion. Neither angel nor demon has seen the Spear in two thousand years, but Azrael claims to know its location. Bedlam has no choice but to interpret woefully outdated clues and race her to its ancient resting place.

His quest is made nearly impossible by the interference of a persnickety archivist, Keziel—his angelic ex—and a dedicated cult intent on keeping the Spear out of the wrong hands. But to Bedlam, “wrong” is just an arbitrary word, and there’s no way he’s letting Khet die without a fight.

BOOK 2: Raising Chaos  4 STARS

This was an interesting switch up from the first, which was mostly about Khet and learning about her past and her journey to save a man’s soul. In this book we still have her trying to save another life, and wanting to help people, but that’s a smaller part of the story. In fact her part of this is almost incongruent against the larger battle between good and evil that is going on elsewhere. Of course, as the description shows, it’s mostly about Bedlam and his attempts to protect Khet. We get to see a new side of him, and he grows and is able to gain some insight into himself and his relationship with Khet, which I love for how it’s not romantic and yet they’re deeply connected to one another in a way they can’t even explain. However, Corrigan doesn’t just give you this little adventure, she continues to expand the universe. Delving into the past even more to show how the rebellion in heaven was caused, and once more interweaving her world with the stories of the Bible we know so well. This is no slap dash idea, she has made something so real with so many layers that it’s a world you can’t help but immerse yourself in. All I want to do now is grab the next to see how it’ll all turn out.

Lara Lillibridge has been INTERVIEWED!!!

1.      What’s your name? Where can we find you? Blog? Twitter? Facebook?

Lara Lillibridge

Website: www.LaraLillibridge.com

Twitter: https://twitter.com/only_mama

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LaraLillibridgeWrites/

Goodreads: Lara Lillibridge

2.      Tell us a little about your life outside of the world of writing.

I have two boys, ages 9 and 12 whom I love to overschedule. I spend a lot of time driving to hockey and baseball and band practice and choir recitals. This is sort of ironic because in my own life, I hate to commit to any sort of activity if I can avoid it.  It’s clearly a case of “do as I say, not as I do,” which children love. 

3.       How long have you been writing? What genres have you written? They don’t have to be published.

I’ve been writing seriously since 2008, when I got pregnant with my second child. By “seriously” I mean that is when I decided to make it a priority in my life. I write mostly creative nonfiction: essays, memoir, and blogs that amuse me and hopefully a few other people on occasion. I occasionally writing fiction, which I am very bad at but have a lot of fun writing. 

4.      What has been the greatest influence to your writing? 

When I was pregnant with my second son, I woke up one day flooded with stories. I wrote and wrote and wrote, and at night I’d lie in bed and think about my stories and my characters. My son—currently nine years old—is a really fine writer, so I’m not sure who influenced whom.  I quickly realized that if I wanted to get published I would need some help, so I went back to school and finished first my undergraduate degree and then my MFA.

The one writer that really transformed how I think about writing is Lidia Yuknavitch. Her memoir, The Chronology of Water, refused to follow any of the conventional forms I had seen up till then, and really freed me in how I thought about the craft of writing. 


5.      Are you currently writing anything now? If so tell us about it? If not make something up…

Yes, I am writing the first draft of a novel that explores gender, sexuality, and power. I’m not sure it’s any good but I’m having a heap of fun writing it. I’m also in the 3rd or 4th revision of a second memoir, Mama, Mama, Only Mama, that details my six years as a single mother. Both of these projects are a lot lighter than my debut memoir, and it’s been a nice change. 

6.      How do you typically begin your projects? Do you create outlines and character profiles or jump in head first with the initial idea? And do you focus on just one at a time?

I don’t really know what I want to say until I start writing, and I write like I talk—with a lot of tangents and circling conversations. When I get about 75% of the way in, I have to get the iron out and try to make the book straighten up and make some sort of sense to other people.

This year, I’ve been ping-ponging between two works in progress. I’ll focus solely on one for a few weeks or months until I’m sick to death of it and convinced it’s utter rubbish, then I’ll switch to the second. When the other project refuses to behave, I go back to the first with renewed appreciation for it. 

7.      What aspect of your writing do you consider your strength? Your weakness?

I’m really good at pounding out pages, which is both my strength and my weakness. I can sit and type all day, every day—I’m really driven and get antsy if I take a few days off. The downside of that is that I suspect I’m too wordy and have too much backstory.  I often rely on my critique partners to tell me when I’m going on and on too long. 

8.      After publishing, the next trouble facing writers is marketing. What do you typically do when marketing your novel? Do you have tips you’d like to share?

I always looked at writing as both an art and a business. From the beginning I looked at what I needed to do to open doors at the next level. For me, that meant starting with a blog, and committing to post three times a week. From there, I started submitting essays to fledgling literary journals.  After I had some success, I moved on to submitting to larger literary journals and contests. Then, when I started shopping my book, I had both publishing credits and some confidence. I don’t know if the publishing credits helped, but the confidence sure did. 

9.      What advice would you give a writer who is starting out?

Take your work seriously. Carve time out for it, and don’t tolerate anyone who acts like it is trivial. Find people to trade work with, as critiquing other people’s work will teach you as much about your own writing as anything else. Read anything someone else recommends, regardless of genre. I look at writing as my job: if I’m not writing, I’m reading or editing for someone else. Make it a priority. The world needs your story. 

Rebecca Kightlinger has been INTERVIEWED!!!

What’s your name? Where can we find you? Blog? Twitter? Facebook?

My name is Rebecca Kightlinger. You can find me on my websites, RebeccaKightlinger.com and BuryDownChronicles.com; on Facebook pages “Rebecca Kightlinger” and “Bury Down Chronicles”; and on Twitter at @RS_Kightlinger.

  1. Tell us a little about your life outside of the world of writing

My husband and I have a big old farmhouse in a small town, and two Border Collies, a Chihuahua, three cats, and a little rooster. Most of my life revolves around them, researching and writing the Bury Down Chronicles series, swimming, walking, and, most of the year, watering roses, berries, and tomatoes.

  1. How long have you been writing? What genres have you written? They don’t have to be published.

I began writing medical articles in the 1990s; then with the medical team I worked with in Guyana, clinical research papers about work we did. I started writing fiction in the 1990s, but not seriously until about 7 years ago. I now write historical fiction and magical realism, but I have published some short stories set in the present day.

  1. What has been the greatest influence to your writing? Other authors, life experiences, etc…

Since many of the characters in my story are healers and there is a strong element of afterlife existence, I would guess that my novels may have been influenced by my own life experiences and theories about the hereafter.

  1. Are you currently writing anything now? If so tell us about it? If not make something up…

I’m working on book two of the series. New people are showing up in Megge’s life, and one of them, Faye, has something to teach Megge in her own home village, out on the northern cliffs of Cornwall.

  1. How do you typically begin your projects? Do you create outlines and character profiles or jump in head first with the initial idea? And do you focus on just one at a time?

I begin by sitting down with a clear head and watching in my mind’s eye for an image to appear. As it does, I start typing, describing what I see and hear. The story takes shape from there. In Megge’s case, she either narrates her story or simply shows a scene, which I describe as clearly as I can. I do have to keep track of characters and timelines so I don’t make errors there, and I do a lot of research after writing out a scene to make sure what I’m seeing was even plausible. Usually it is, but sometimes I have to revise when my understanding was wrong.

I usually focus on my novel, but now and then I feel like writing a short story. Or, when I sit down to work on the novel, a different narrator shows up and that person’s story—often just a vignette—takes shape. In those cases, I just go with it and write that story.

But I only work on one novel at a time!

  1. What aspect of your writing do you consider your strength? Your weakness?

Readers frequently remark that they feel they are right there, in the story, as it plays out, so I guess my strength is evoking the setting. I enjoy creating the atmosphere through the senses and trying to convey to readers what I feel as I live inside the scene the narrator is showing me.

Describing a character’s physical appearance is always awkward, but it is especially difficult in this narrative since Megge would only ever describe a person if their appearance strikes her as remarkable or if it has a direct bearing on the scene. Usually readers formulate their own image of characters anyway, and I think many prefer to do so, so I feel comfortable keeping description spare.

  1. After publishing, the next trouble facing writers is marketing. What do you typically do when marketing your novel? Do you have tips you’d like to share?

The final class in our MFA program a transition to the real world of writing and marketing our work, and in that class we had to make a website. Thank goodness for Suzanne Strempek Shea guiding us through that, because I had no idea how to create one! The website has made it easier for readers to learn more about Megge. Suzanne also taught us about using social media, which I was inexperienced with, and I gave The Bury Down Chronicles a Facebook page. That’s made it easier to let readers know what’s happening now with the book and with author events. But beyond that, marketing is incomprehensible to me! It is a profession, so I leave it to professionals.

For Megge, I found a publicity firm that works exclusively with authors, and I just do everything they recommend. The important thing is to reach readers who might enjoy the book, and that’s what they’re helping me to do.

  1. What advice would you give a writer who is starting out?

There’s nothing better than starting something new! I’d say just start writing and see what comes out. If it turns out you enjoy writing and want to write with the skill and focus of a professional, learn the craft. Right down to the ground. Grammar, punctuation, sentence structure—it all matters.

Consider investing in formal education. Workshops and in-person courses with a professor will challenge you to look critically at your work and learn how to make it better. It will also give you colleagues and the understanding that you are not the only one sitting alone in a room scribbling!

Finally—and everybody says this because it’s true—persevere! If you write something but can’t find an agent or publisher right away, write some more, maybe something entirely different. Give each piece—and yourself—the necessary time to find a publishing home and enthusiastic readers.

Ryan Hauge has been INTERVIEWED!!!

1. What’s your name? Where can we find you? Blog? Twitter? Facebook?

I’m Ryan Hauge, the author of Be Careful What You Joust For.  You can find me at:

Blog:  https://www.ryanhauge.com/

Goodreads:  https://www.goodreads.com/RyanHauge

Amazon: http://bit.ly/HaugeAMZ
Facebook: http://bit.ly/HaugeFB
Twitter: http://bit.ly/HaugeTweet

  1. Tell us a little about your life outside of the world of writing.

Ivy Smoak (my co-author on Be Careful What You Joust For…and my wife) and I started a toy company when we graduated from college.  Designing toys and managing the business takes up a ton of time, but I still somehow find time to write.  Oh, and cooking lots of Blue Apron, Homechef, and Plated meals…I’m kind of addicted to those.

  1. How long have you been writing? What genres have you written? They don’t have to be published.

After seeing the Hobbit in theaters, my family started a challenge to see which of us could write the best fantasy novel.  Mine was okay.  Not horrible, but not great either.  So I went back to the drawing board, spent a few years building the world, and then got back into it with BCWYJF.  So to answer the original question…about 5 years, and I’ve only written fantasy.  I might do a modern thriller at some point, though, but right now I’m completely focused on the Pentavia series!

  1. What has been the greatest influence to your writing? Other authors, life experiences, etc…

How can I pick just one thing?  There are so many great authors out there.  Great TV shows.  Great movies.  Great fantasy art.  All of it inspires me.  But if you’re going to force me to pick one thing, I’d have to give the nod to the classic RPGs I played growing up.  I can’t even count the amount of hours I spent playing the Quest for Glory series and Baldur’s Gate 2.  I was too young to really know how to play them, so I would just wander around aimlessly killing as many monsters as I could.  Little did I know that I was actually doing research for my fantasy novels…

  1. Are you currently writing anything now? If so tell us about it? If not make something up…

Right now I’m completely focused on marketing BCWYJF, but the outline of Book 2 is slowly coming together in my head.

  1. How do you typically begin your projects? Do you create outlines and character profiles or jump in head first with the initial idea? And do you focus on just one at a time?

I outline the plot first.  But I don’t think that’s the right way to do it.  All too often it leads to me trying to shove a square character into a round plot.  It just doesn’t fit.  And then I get writer’s block.  And then the book just sits there until I realize my plot is all wrong.

So with book 2, I’m going to take a slightly different approach and see if the characters can guide the story.  If I’m being completely honest, though, I’ll probably outline the whole thing fifty times before it’s finished.  That’s just how my mind works.

  1. What aspect of your writing do you consider your strength? Your weakness?

My strength is in world building and plotting.  I love both, and spend a ridiculous amount of time on them.  My weakness is definitely character emotions.  I’m an emotionless robot, so it’s hard to write characters that aren’t.  That’s one of the countless places where my wonderful co-author Ivy Smoak helped immensely.

  1. After publishing, the next trouble facing writers is marketing. What do you typically do when marketing your novel? Do you have tips you’d like to share?

I wish I had tips to share, but at this point, I don’t know if any of it is going to work.  Talk to me after the release on April 17th and maybe then I’ll have some pointers about what to do.  My strategy so far has been to do anything I can think of.  Social media, Goodreads, paid advertising.  All of it.  It’s easily an 80 hour a week endeavor.

  1. What advice would you give a writer who is starting out?

I could give a million pieces of advice.  Write for a specific audience.  Learn how to use commas.  Read between the lines if you force your friends and family to read it.  They’ll tell you it’s great.  But how long did it take them to read that next chapter?

My number one piece of advice, though, would be that being an author also means being a full time marketer.  A great author can get a few good reviews.  A great marketer can sell some copies.  But to really hit it big, you need to be both.

Dawn Davis has been INTERVIEWED!!!

  1. What your name? Where can we find you? Blog? Twitter? Facebook?

Dawn Davis, www.towerroomseries.com

  1. Tell us a little about your life outside of the world of writing.

I spend a lot of time walking through the ravine, in the neighborhood, looking at things and listening. I visit with my daughter and friends and I like to cook and bake both for others and myself.  I also take ballroom dance lessons (tango my favorite) which I find to be a great way to work out and have fun at the same time. I study jazz piano, take lessons and play with other people. I have always been deeply moved and influenced by Bill Evans who is by far, the greatest piano player I have ever heard. In a sometimes messy and overly loud world he is perfection.

  1. How long have you been writing? What genres have you written? They don’t have to be published.

I have been writing most of my life. I was a teacher for many years and am used to taking notes, writing lesson plans, etc. I have written poems, plays, comedy sketches and most currently, novels.

  1. What has been your greatest influence to your writing? Other authors, life experiences, etc…

I find that everything relates to writing; conversations, sights, sounds, tastes, smells. I have always listened carefully to what people say and how they say it. I remember what people say and am constantly amazed that so many people do not remember what I say – in this very noisy world I think people block out a lot but ironically, need to be surrounded by sound at all times. As for writers, there are many – Dickens, Tolstoy, Chekov, Dostoyevsky, Vonnegut, Jr., Anne Tyler, Kate Atkinson, J.D. Salinger John Mortimer, John Le Carre, Patrick Dennis, Tom Wolfe…..the list goes on and on. I read for at least two hours everyday and am so grateful there are more books than I will ever have time to read in this lifetime.

  1. Are you currently writing anything right now? If so, tell us about it.

I am working on the third book in the Tower Room series. It is called “Little by Little” and it tells the story of Dilys Frank’s first “travel from the tower room.” It is initially set in Toronto in 1929 and goes back in time to 1850, Buffalo, New York, and tells the story of two children escaping via ‘the underground railroad’ to Canada.

  1. How do you typically begin your projects? Do you create outlines and character profiles or jump in head first with an initial idea? And do you focus on just one at a time?

First, I research either on-line, in the library and read a lot of material regarding the time and place of the book. I then create a very detailed outline and immediately ignore it when I start writing. I write a first draft and then review what I need to remove and what I need to add. The basic story remains the same but some characters are eliminated, sideline stories are either developed or deleted. I generally write about six drafts before the novel is finished, or as finished as it will be.

  1. What aspect of writing do you consider your strength? Your weaknesss?

Dialogue is my strength, description is my weakness. I hear much better than I see. When I am working on a book the voices of the characters are always in my head but the way they look? That is sometimes shadowy.

  1. After publishing, the next trouble facing writers is marketing. What do you typically do when marketing your novel? Do you have tips you’d like to share?

I email my friends that I have written and new book (about 15 people) add the book to my website and then hire a publicist. I am not a good self promoter.

  1. What advice would you give a writer who is starting out?

Don’t look back – look forward. Regarding first drafts – I find I can get very bogged down if I am constantly revising what I have written the day before.

Adison Runberg has been INTERVIEWED!!!

1.What’s your name? Where can we find you? Blog? Twitter? Facebook?

My name is Adison Runberg.  The best places to find me online are Instagram https://www.instagram.com/adisonrunberg/ and Soundcloud https://soundcloud.com/adison-runberg.  Photography and creating music are two of my favorite pastimes besides writing.

2.Tell us a little about your life outside of the world of writing.

I live in Duluth with my wonderful girlfriend Sylvia.  I spend the long winter days drinking coffee and tea, snowboarding, and doing creative things in my spare time.  Winter offers a lot of really unique opportunities for photography so I try to take advantage of that as much as possible.  Summer offers a chance to hike and swim in the lakes we have all over Minnesota.  Also, I’m really into Pokemon GO, my main goal with pogo is to get as many Dragonites as I can.

  1. How long have you been writing? What genres have you written? They don’t have to be published.

When I was in elementary school my mom and I would come up with stories to go with classical music since then I loved creating stories.  I have been writing since high-school and was the editor of the school newspaper my senior year.  I most enjoy writing fantasy and being as creative as possible.  I love employing humor into my writing.

  1. What has been the greatest influence on your writing? Other authors, life experiences, etc…

The authors who have influenced me most are George R. R. Martin, Douglas Adams,  and J.K. Rowling.  There are countless others but these three have created masterpieces that I read time and time again.  Everything in life can influence you in some way, I try to see the beauty in the world, and appreciate the small things in life.  I often think of plot points and new scenes while taking a walk through my local park.

  1. Are you currently writing anything now? If so tell us about it? If not make something up…

I have just started writing the sequel to Origin of Legends and the Secrets of the North.  I haven’t chosen a name for the sequel yet.  This book will be slightly darker in tone and have a much more developed antagonist.  This new story has been fun to work on because it has a timeline that jumps around, and is told from differing viewpoints throughout.

  1. How do you typically begin your projects? Do you create outlines and character profiles or jump in head first with the initial idea? And do you focus on just one at a time?

I begin my projects with a basic story arc in mind.  I then split this arc into at least 5 major points.  I’ll start writing linearly from the beginning to the end, meeting each of these goal points.  New and interesting ideas come to me while writing, and when they do it is always exciting.  I love researching ancient mythology and incorporating those stories in with my writing.  I often base my characters on real people, this helps me write more realistic dialogue, and know their motivations in each scene.

  1. What aspect of your writing do you consider your strength? Your weakness?

I am very strong at meeting my daily writing goal of 1000 words and sticking to my outlines.  This helps me write efficiently.  The main weakness I’ve noticed so far in my writing is that I like to write about eating food far too often in my stories, I’ll often delete a whole page where I decided to write about a feast that doesn’t progress the plot.

  1. After publishing, the next trouble facing writers is marketing. What do you typically do when marketing your novel? Do you have tips you’d like to share?

Marketing is a very important part of writing because without it your book may never be read by anyone.  I have watched many hours of YouTube videos on the subject.  Marketing is very interesting and is always changing in the book industry.  I recommend Derek Murphy’s YouTube channel to anyone looking for where to start when it comes to marketing.  This advice will be for self-publishing authors.  To start with before you market your book you will want reviews.  You should contact book bloggers before you publish your book so that they have time to read your book and are ready to review your book when it is published on Amazon.  I would recommend contacting as many as possible if you are confident with your book.  You will want a way for your readers to sign up for a mailing list so you can let them know when you come out with new content.  Once you publish your book and have at least 10 reviews then I would recommend you start advertising on Amazon, many people have had very good luck with this.  Also see if other popular authors in your genre will send out an email to their followers to let them know about your book.

  1. What advice would you give a writer who is starting out?

Have a plan and stick to it.  Learn from what works well and what doesn’t, this way your next plan will be better than the first, and you will progress and become better in the process.   Have fun while you are writing, but don’t be afraid to put in some hard work while in the phases that come after you complete your manuscript.

Sara Crawford has been INTERVIEWED!!!

1.      What’s your name? Where can we find you? Blog? Twitter? Facebook?

Sara Crawford
http://saracrawford.net
http://twitter.com/sara_crawford
http://facebook.com/saracrawfordmusic
http://instagram.com/saraecrawford

2.      Tell us a little about your life outside of the world of writing.

I’m a freelance writer and internet marketer by day as well as an adjunct creative writing professor for the online graduate program at Southern New Hampshire University so I’m afraid I don’t have much of a life outside of writing! I do live with my husband, Peter, though, and my two cats, Frank and Julian. And I post way too many cat pictures on Instagram.

3.       How long have you been writing? What genres have you written? They don’t have to be published.

I have been writing pretty constantly since I learned how. When I was 7, I used to write little plays and make the neighborhood kids perform them in the driveway. I have written plays and screenplays, but lately, I write mostly young adult urban fantasy fiction.

4.      What has been the greatest influence to your writing? Other authors, life experiences, etc…

I have had so many theatre, literature, and creative writing teachers over the course of high school, college, and grad school in my MFA program that were huge influences on me. I am also greatly influenced by my favorite authors (Anne Rice, Jane Austen, Stephen Chbosky, Rainbow Rowell, Stephenie Meyer) and my favorite musicians (M83, Beach House, Slowdive, Morrissey, Smashing Pumpkins, the list goes on).

5.      Are you currently writing anything now? If so tell us about it? If not make something up…

Yes, I am working on the third and final book in The Muse Chronicles called You and the Night. It should be coming out sometime in 2018 though I’m not sure when.

6.      How do you typically begin your projects? Do you create outlines and character profiles or jump in head first with the initial idea? And do you focus on just one at a time?

I used to always be a pantser, especially with fiction. I would write 100 pages before I even knew what story I was trying to tell. Now I’m sort of a combination of plotter and pantser. I try to write a vague outline of the whole story, then I do a detailed outline for about five chapters, and then I’ll write those chapters. Then I’ll repeat until I’m finished. I may make big changes when I’m drafting or revising but I try not to start writing until I have some idea of where the story is going.

7.      What aspect of your writing do you consider your strength? Your weakness?

Because I’m also a playwright, I think dialogue is my greatest strength. This can also be a weakness, though, because I tend to use it too much, and sometimes I need more reflection and description.

8.      After publishing, the next trouble facing writers is marketing. What do you typically do when marketing your novel? Do you have tips you’d like to share?

Lately, I’ve been reaching out to people on Amazon who have reviewed other indie books in my genre and telling them about my books. I’ve had a lot of great results with that. I think the main thing with marketing is persistence. You have to be willing to work hard and try different things.

9.      What advice would you give a writer who is starting out?

When you’re just starting out, don’t worry about literary agents or traditional publishing or self-publishing or critique partners or beta readers. It should just be you and the story, and you should try to focus on what you love about the writing process. Once you have a story, then you can get feedback from peers and teachers and editors and decide what to do with it.

Oracle of Philadelphia

Oracle of Philadelphia by Elizabeth Corrigan description

Carrie works at a diner in South Philadelphia, dispensing advice to humans and angels wise enough to seek her counsel. But there are some problems that even the best advice can’t solve.

Her latest supplicant, Sebastian, is unique among those who have sought her aid. He sold his soul to a demon in exchange for his sister’s life, but his heart remains pure.

Carrie has lived for millennia with the knowledge that her immortality is due to the suffering of others, and she cannot bear to see another good man damned when it is within her power to prevent it.

In order to renegotiate his contract, Carrie must travel into the depths of hell and parley with the demons that control its pathways. As the cost of her journey rises, Carrie must determine how much she is willing to sacrifice to save one good soul.

BOOK 1 Oracle of Philadelphia 5 STARS

This is only the second book I’ve read by Corrigan, but if there’s one thing I’ve realized it’s that her stories are endlessly surprising. I expected a huge battle between good an evil, with her probably falling for the lost soul she’s fighting to save. Nope. As much as I love a good romance, it’s not a crutch Corrigan relies on. There are moments dealing with Carrie’s wanting someone to be with, and even dealing with the relationships within the angels and demons. The story itself, though, was about Carrie finally finding something worth risking everything for, and dealing with the weight her past has put upon her. Corrigan does a great job of telling the tale of someone who is several thousands of years old, giving flashbacks of moments that tie into what is happening right now, and develops the characters thoroughly. My favorite of them is Bedlam. He’s a demon, but one who questions whether that means he truly is evil or if he has the ability to choose to be good, and adds a bit of humor to a rather serious tale. However, that there was what made this story so wonderful, because the lines aren’t clear cut. The angels have their struggles and the demons aren’t the one deminsional bad guy. They’re beings who have a real past and real pain that has distorted their original purpose. The angel who was meant to spread the nature of abundance and giving has been twisted into the demon of gluttony. The angel of mercy now is a demon that whispers to the world that there is no hope. It gave them each something more to discover, and helped set up what will surely be a very interesting series. The fact that this is dealing with Heaven and Hell and events in the Bible, made me a little worried. Too often such stories either make it a joke or try to completely undo the foundation of the Christian faith, and this book did neither. It was interesting the events that Carrie actually lived through, and the way they supposedly actually happened. It was a realistic depiction of that time, and if that was what did happen it would in no way alter what Christians believe, and remained very respectful to such. But if you’re not Christian, this book would still be very enjoyable. It’s not preachy, it’s not trying to convert someone to Christianity, if anything it’s showing how everyone, even those who know for a fact that there is a Heaven and Hell, have the right to question those beliefs and faith and what is the real meaning of good and evil.

The Orphan and the Thief

The Orphan and the Thief  by  M. L. LeGette  description:

A middle-grade adventure that will keep you and your kids spellbound.

Toad thought it’d be easy to steal from Mr. Edward P. Owl. Unfortunately for Toad, he isn’t the best of thieves. Caught in the act, he’s in more trouble than ever before. Now to save his hide, Toad must track down five rare potion ingredients for Mr. Owl. Or else.

All Melena Snead wants is her family back, but after the Miggens Street Fire, that isn’t very likely. Orphaned and miserable, forced to work in an apothecary, she’s determined to find Milo, her missing brother. No matter what.

When Melena finds Toad ransacking her apothecary, Toad gets a nasty shock: apothecaries don’t carry Mr. Owl’s ingredients. Luckily, Melena’s willing to help, for a price.

With Melena’s pet Spit-Fire dragon and Toad’s enchanted talking beer mug, they embark on a fantastical journey, traveling the country in search of the potion ingredients. But can they gather all of them in time, what with monsters, pirates, and axe-wielding thieves? And if they do, is there an even greater danger waiting for them at the end?

The Orphan and the Thief   4 STARS

Talk about a jolly good adventure. I loved that while this is a good clean young readers book, LeGette doesn’t shy away from how evil some people can be. The threat Owl presents isn’t some silliness to be laughed off, but a real villain that would strike fear into any other supposed bad guy, such as the Ramblers. But Owl is just the beginning, the real story is the growth that Toad goes through. He goes from being a boy that just wants to impress the Ramblers on what a good thief he is, to being a guy that wants to be someone that Melena can rely on, because she’s the first real friend he’s ever had. The same goes for her, she gets to discover the world and how to be strong in her own way. And it is an amazing world, full of magic, dragons, and pirates. Each ingredient they go for is a new adventure filled with monsters and endless discoveries. Now all I can ask for is more. I want to know where Joe really came from, what’s Izzie’s back story, what is the rest of this incredible world like? A wonderful story altogether.