My Top 5 Favorite Books of 2017

Long ago in 2017 I surpassed my Goodreads reading challenge of 60 books, and made it all the way to 63. I know, I’m amazing. However, I wanted to look back and list the top 5 books that I read last year. Now I am skipping over books I’ve read before, and only listing those that I read for the first time in 2017.

  1. The Sugar Queen by Sarah Addison Allen

This book is as sweet as it sounds. I’ve come to love several of Allen’s books, and I actually read 2 other of her books this past year. This I think was my favorite of hers simply because I can relate to the sugary sweet cravings that Josey is subject too. But like most of her books, there’s this hint of magic in the air, where even in a world that’s created to be as realistic and relatable as our own, there’s still that chance that anything is possible.

  1. An American Werewolf in Hoboken by Dakota Cassidy

If you ever read a book by Cassidy you know how much good humor there is in them. This one by far is the most hilarious. I practically had to smother myself to keep from laughing out loud at work. It was so much fun to read, and an interesting set of issues for werewolves to have to deal with that I’ve never once seen brought up in other books. Which in a way made it more realistic, and of course more interesting.

  1. A Girl in Black and White by Danielle Lori

This is actually the 2nd book in the Alyria series. While the first was rather good, this took Calamity to a whole new level. It’s always nice to read a series that gets better with each book, and this one was a fascinating story to begin with. Definitely one that keeps you wanting more.

  1. The Beast of Talesend by Kyle Robert Shultz

I love fairy tale retellings, and I love the old detective stories of a world weary gumshoe just trying to do the right thing. In this I got both. It’s funny and exciting, and it’s another series that each book takes you on a new twisty turn of old tales.

  1. T&A: Revelations of a Romance Novel Heroine by Jill Monroe

If you love romance novels, but are also the sort to wonder why the heroine always makes such silly mistakes, or does crazy things, then this is definitely a book you should pick up. After all Annalise actually knows she’s in a romance novel and is just trying to figure out exactly where the script is taking her.

There were plenty of other good books I read, some within the series of the ones I listed, and some that I chose to read over and over again. But when scrolling through my list these were the main ones that jumped out for me, and I definitely won’t be forgetting them any time soon.


Steven Drake has been INTERVIEWED!!!

  1. What’s your name? Where can we find you? Blog? Twitter? Facebook? 

My name is Steven Drake. I have a free blog, where I post short articles on whatever catches my interest. I don’t post as much as I used to since I spend most of my time on my book series, but I enjoy a change of pace now and then. I do not have a Facebook Page but my book series has one. It’s not very popular yet, but I hope that changes eventually. No twitter. With my writing style, there’s not much worthwhile I can say in fewer than 140 characters.

  1. Tell us a little about your life outside of the world of writing. 

I work for a small business that sells remanufactured printer cartridges, essential oils, microroast coffee, and a few other wildly unrelated things. My employers have several business ventures and I run their computers, help with spreadsheets, make deliveries, basically whatever needs doing. They tolerate my eccentric nature and have inspired me with their entrepreneurial spirit.

  1. How long have you been writing? What genres have you written? They don’t have to be published. 

I actually started with my blog, which started as mostly something for my friends and family to read. I wrote a couple of short stories which I got a lot of positive feedback on and decided to try writing a fantasy novel. It’s something I’ve always dreamed of doing. I’ve now written the first four installments, so I’m still early in my writing career. I’m always eager for any feedback that will help me improve as a writer.

  1. What has been the greatest influence to your writing? Other authors, life experiences, etc. 

J.R.R. Tolkien is easily the single greatest influence on my writing. That’s a pretty standard answer among fantasy authors I imagine. I must have read those a half dozen times as a teen.

  1. Are you currently writing anything now? If so tell us about it? If not make something up…

I’m working on Book 5 of the Demon’s Blade saga. Hope to release that sometime in 2018. I’ve always got a couple possible blog entries bouncing around in my head. When those will ripen, I couldn’t say. Beyond the Demon’s Blade saga, I have the concept idea for a YA series, but that one will be a while away.

  1. How do you typically begin your projects? Do you create outlines and character profiles or jump in head first with the initial idea? And do you focus on just one at a time?

I do some outlining, but it’s all in my head. I don’t write it down or anything. I know more or less how I want the story to go

  1. What aspect of your writing do you consider your strength? Your weakness?

I think the strongest aspect of my writing is my characters. I really take a lot of care as I write to put myself in the mind of each character. When I’m going through doing revisions, I’m constantly asking myself whether the characters thoughts, words, and actions are the best reflection of the person I consider them to be. In my mind, they’re all real people, and I care about them. I also have watched a lot of movies, television, video games, and anime that are centered on combat, whether it’s in space with lasers and giant mechs or in some medieval fantasy setting with demons, monsters, swords, and magic. I’ve seen so many different kinds of fights between characters with so many different abilities, I’m usually able to make my battles and action scenes more interesting than clanging swords and throwing fireballs.

My greatest weakness is probably my inexperience and lack of formal education in the arts. I’m sure anyone who’s an experienced professional writer could point out some amateurish mistakes I’m making. I hope eventually some of them will leave reviews or contact me so I can improve my style. I’m sure my grammar isn’t always perfect and my sentence structure could improve a lot. Hopefully that will come with time and practice.

  1. After publishing, the next trouble facing writers is marketing. What do you typically do when marketing your novel? Do you have tips you’d like to share? 

I’m woefully awful at marketing. I suffer from a few disorders, most notably Asperger’s, that make socialization tiring and difficult. I don’t do it very much or very well. I’m terrible at any form of social networking and largely clueless when it comes to forming relationships with actual flesh and blood human beings. So marketing is a challenge, and usually comes down to budget. There’s very little I’m comfortable or skilled enough to do on my own, so I pay for advertising when I can. I hired a publicity firm for the release of Fallen Star, and it’s produced some good marketing opportunities. If I can afford it in the future, I’ll do more.

  1. What advice would you give a writer who is starting out?

Ha, I feel like I should be the one asking. Really, I don’t have enough experience myself to give any advice. I’ve still got a long way to go.


Seahaven: an Underwater Fantasy Adventure

Seahaven  by  Raymond Cain   description:

He’s reckless, impulsive, and barely eighteen, but Flynn Arcturus is the best damn pilot on the ocean floor. In his short lifetime, he’s dealt with angry sea dragons and seductive mermaids, but nothing could have prepared him for the death of his parents.

Flynn’s parents aren’t the first to die under mysterious circumstances. Many residents of Seahaven, the domed underwater city where he lives, are getting killed by seemingly random acts of misfortune. When he investigates, he discovers an ancient threat, imprisoned for centuries, once again endangers Seahaven.

Equipped with superb piloting skills and an extraordinary ship built by his genius brother, Flynn may be the only one who can save Seahaven. But when he discovers what he’s up against, he realizes he’s out of his depth.

BOOK 1: Seahaven  3 STARS

I’m not sure I should even give it 3 STARS, but the writing was well done and the idea was an interesting one. An underwater city that apparently has no idea about the world above, though evidence of wrecked ships and other bits show that it’s obviously taking place in our world. It seems they’ve lost a lot of their history and perhaps that’s why they don’t know how they ended up where they are. It’s an interesting mix of magic and advanced technology that allow them to live and function in their city, and yet oddly they’re not allowed to go beyond what is deemed the Safe Zone. From the beginning you get this hint at mystery and things that Flynn is trying to understand. Flynn being the main character is the focus of the story even though it’s in 3rd person. However, while he starts out as a hero type, saving a whale from bullies hurting it, and even feeling sorry for a mermaid who he believes may have gotten hurt while he was chasing it trying to get answers about his family, he quickly goes down hill. Yes he gets bullied, but he also does a lot to antagonize the bullies himself. More so, he can be just as cruel. He basically attempts to murder a water golem because it suits his own needs. And at first it may seem like water golems are nothing but magic used to make water beings to carry out undesirable tasks, it becomes obvious they’re more than that. Any being that can refuse to do what a person asks, and fight them off while trying to protect themselves, and screams (albeit silently) in pain is clearly not just some mindless drone but something that if killed should count as murder. Even though clearly none of the people there seem to care too much for them. Worse still, was the mention of stuffed merfolk on display, and those are definitely beings on the level with humans, and while any stuffed creature is creepy, that is downright traumatizing to think of. Plus while at first it seems he wants to go to what equates to a military academy to honor his parents, the thoughtful and loving act gets destroyed by his further adding that he really just wants to go to college in order to get a ring that’ll allow him into bars because he really wants to be able to get drunk like the guys he sees in them. So much of what started out to be a decent hero character becomes as unlikeable as everyone else in this book. He isn’t even set up to be a good anti-hero. So much of this book reads like a fun adventure for young readers, but then there’s parts that seem out of place and a bit too mature for such. Altogether, while it wasn’t horrible, it definitely had its issues that makes it hard to really care about what happens next.

The Truth Behind Jacob Marley’s Words

“I wear the chain I forged in life….I made it link by link, and yard by yard; I girded it on of my own free will, and of my own free will I wore it.”

–Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol

Okay, this is probably pretty strange to have as your favorite Christmas quote. I’ve even written about it before, but it doesn’t matter I still love it. However, I think the thing I love most about A Christmas Carol is that it isn’t just about the magic of Christmas during December, it’s about a man who learns about the magic of giving and caring for others that he carries with him all year long. I love Christmas movies, they’re sweet good fun that makes me happy, and something special to look forward to this time of the year. For some reason I just can’t bring myself to watch them in other time no matter how awesome they are. Yet, with most of them it tends to be just about something magical that happens then, and doesn’t really focus on the things that Christmas is supposed to be about. Peace on Earth, good will toward mankind. Which isn’t something that only happens in the month of December, or at least it shouldn’t be.

My coworker came in today and was talking about how happy he was that the person in front of him in the line at McDonalds bought his meal, because he’s actually broke but you know you gotta eat. He didn’t understand why they did that, and apparently hadn’t heard about these things people do, mainly at Christmas. I explained it to him, and he still seemed a bit perplexed. Which is sad. Someone doing something nice, albeit without really knowing whether the person behind them really needs help paying for their meal or not, shouldn’t be a perplexing experience. It should always be considered nice, and something we need to show appreciation for, because we definitely should never take such for granted, but it also shouldn’t be considered so out of character for people in general.

Whether you believe in an after life or not, I think something to be considered is the weight of your actions. The chain we’re building around our neck may be far heavier than we realize, and the weight may be dragging us down to levels we never would’ve imagined us sinking to. No one starts out in life thinking so little of the people around them. So ready to pass on by terrible things they see, and pretend it’s not happening because they don’t want to get involved. We’ve become a society who is quicker to take a selfie of themselves at some terrible scene to show that we were in fact there, than we are to step up and take action to help others. I watched a video done by Burger King that showed people would go up and complain and be so upset if they got a burger that looked like someone had smashed it to pieces, but they would sit there and watch a kid be bullied and messed with and have his food taken from him. Because that wasn’t their problem right?

The Christmas spirit of giving and loving is a magic that should be carried with us all year round. We should want to do more for those around us. People constantly talk about how the world should be a better place, and they can’t understand all the terrible things that happen in it. The best way to make the world better is to start with yourself, because as you become better then all your interactions will be better, and you’ll help make the people around you better as well. It may not seem like a huge monumental change, but change rarely happens in some huge sweeping motion. Change takes time, and effort, and if we’re willing to do so then I think we would free the world of the chains that weigh it down so much.

Lily Luchesi has been INTERVIEWED!!!

1. What’s your name? Where can we find you? Blog? Twitter? Facebook?

Hi, I’m Lily Luchesi, and I’m the bestselling and award winning author of the Paranormal Detectives Series and other stories. You can find me via the following:


  1. Tell us a little about your life outside of the world of writing.

When I’m not writing, I’m mostly a homebody. I love to cook, read, watch TV, and listen to music. I’m also an avid fandom merch collector, especially Funko Pop dolls.

  1. How long have you been writing? What genres have you written? They don’t have to be published.

I’ve been writing professionally for two and a half years, and just released my eighth solo book, Never Again, which is a supernatural war thriller set between Israel in the 1500s and modern day, starring an immortal male siren as he fights against the demons the Nazis set upon the Jews.
I have written horror (paranormal and erotica). I love monsters, the creepier the better. But I make sure all my stories have a silver lining, usually a romantic subplot to give the reader hope amidst a lot of bloodshed. My Paranormal Detectives Series could also be considered a mystery series, as it follows a mortal detective and a vampire special agent as they search for various paranormal criminals.

  1. What has been the greatest influence to your writing? Other authors, life experiences, etc…

A prolonged exposure to the unnatural as a child. Growing up Catholic, I was immersed in spirituality from a young age. I was also exposed to ghosts and vampires and such as a toddler, and thanks to my mom leaving those old cartoons and black and white shows on, I found my love of the macabre and honed that in my writing.

  1. Are you currently writing anything now? If so tell us about it? If not make something up…

I just finished and published Never Again, as I previously mentioned. I am now in the editing stages of my March 7th release, The Coven Princess. It’s my first dive into YA, but it’s still paranormal/horror, featuring a young witch who was born with mixed Dark and Light blood, entering adulthood while a Dark magic war is brewing. It’s my longest book yet at 100k words, and I am so excited!

  1. How do you typically begin your projects? Do you create outlines and character profiles or jump in head first with the initial idea? And do you focus on just one at a time?

I just get ideas and jump right in. I find plotting ruins my creativity. I will work on two to three projects at a time, but mostly focus on one at a time so I can complete them sooner.

  1. What aspect of your writing do you consider your strength? Your weakness?

Good question. I think my strength is building realistic characters. All my women are independent, tough, intelligent in their own way. My men sometimes suffer from stubbornness, but they don’t succumb to toxic masculinity. That’s a big deal for me.
My weakness…I think too fast for my fingers to write or type. I often have to go back in the second draft and add detail.

  1. After publishing, the next trouble facing writers is marketing. What do you typically do when marketing your novel? Do you have tips you’d like to share?

Every author has something different that works. I am lucky to have a great publisher behind me (Vamptasy/CHBB Publishing) and they help me immensely. Having a core street team with ARC readers is a big help, too.

  1. What advice would you give a writer who is starting out?

Don’t get discouraged. There will always be rejections, bad reviews, authors who are more successful. Be your best, write the books you want to read, and your career will build itself.


The Chemist

The Chemist  by  Stephenie Meyer  description:

In this gripping page-turner, an ex-agent on the run from her former employers must take one more case to clear her name and save her life.

She used to work for the U.S. government, but very few people ever knew that. An expert in her field, she was one of the darkest secrets of an agency so clandestine it doesn’t even have a name. And when they decided she was a liability, they came for her without warning.

Now she rarely stays in the same place or uses the same name for long. They’ve killed the only other person she trusted, but something she knows still poses a threat. They want her dead, and soon.
When her former handler offers her a way out, she realizes it’s her only chance to erase the giant target on her back. But it means taking one last job for her ex-employers. To her horror, the information she acquires only makes her situation more dangerous.

Resolving to meet the threat head-on, she prepares for the toughest fight of her life but finds herself falling for a man who can only complicate her likelihood of survival. As she sees her choices being rapidly whittled down, she must apply her unique talents in ways she never dreamed of.
In this tautly plotted novel, Meyer creates a fierce and fascinating new heroine with a very specialized skill set. And she shows once again why she’s one of the world’s bestselling authors. 

The Chemist   2 STARS

This is a rare review for me, because I usually don’t review a book unless I read it all the way through, which is why I gave it the benefit of the doubt with 2 STARS instead of just 1 STAR. I’ve never been ashamed to admit that I liked Twilight. Don’t know how so many people can act like the didn’t considering how well it did. More so I loved Host, and had really wished that she would write the sequel like she said she would. Instead we get what is supposed to be an adult thriller novel, however it really doesn’t read like one. Meyer should perhaps just stick to writing YA, because she’s good at that, and that’s really what this reads as, because the main character sounds more like a naive teen than an adult government agent whose job is to torture people. After all, if she was such an agent she would be trained in many tactics that would’ve helped her while on the run. She definitely wouldn’t have needed to steal books from the library, especially fictional ones, in order to get good pointers on what to do. What was even sadder was when both the book she read, and her own common sense, said the email offering to wipe her slate clean was a trap, but she decided that maybe she should just take a chance anyway. And while I believe in forgiveness, and rectifying ones mistakes to the point that a romance could blossom from the situation she finds herself in, it also feels like it was a bit rushed and too forced to be viable. It’s like Meyer herself has never read a thriller novel or did any research on secret agents. Also the cliche of an agency being so clandestine that it doesn’t even have a name is so over done. Why wouldn’t it have a name? Wouldn’t it be more suspicious for government funds to be disappearing to pay for people and stuff in a nameless agency than one that had a name even if its purpose was classified. Like does giving it a name somehow make it more likely for someone to figure out who they were and what they did? It just never makes sense to me. But what do I know, I’m just a civilian being lied to by the government who assures me that such things don’t really exist.

The Barbarian Before Christmas

Due to the number of books in this series I’m just going to add the link to the list of books I’ve reviewed by Ruby Dixon. While this is apart of the Ice Planet Barbarian series, it still requires you to have read the first book in the Icehome series.

The Barbarian Before Christmas   description:

The growing barbarian tribe is about to celebrate No-Poison Day – a time of love, laughter, and gifts. But all Elly wants is for her mate to be at her side before the brutal season arrives. All Bek wants is a way to quickly return to his female despite the mountains between them. Thanks to the talents of a newcomer…they’re both about to get their wish and celebrate the happiest of holidays together

BOOK 17.5: The Barbarian Before Christmas    5 STARS

This was a short story, but still managed to give such a fun look at their No Poison Day celebration. I love these short stories because you get to see so many of the couples and get a more rounded view of what’s going on in the village, both in Croatoan and Icehome. The main focus was on Bek and Elly, who are definitely my favorite couple. I loved that Dixon didn’t just automatically “fix” Elly. Elly loves Bek and they have a great relationship, but she still has trouble socializing, and hasn’t gotten over her fears, such as needing someone else to taste her food before she eats. Perhaps I like her so much because I can relate to the anxiety and depression of being a part from the one you love for long periods of time, and altogether Dixon handled it perfectly. After them, seeing Lila and getting to know what it was like for her being able to hear now was wonderful. I’d been curious considering she hadn’t seemed all that moved over the change when it first happened, but in this we really get to experience what it’s meant to her. All the Barbarians, humans, and new alien men gave a lot to this story even in such a short format, and it always just makes me want more.

Elizabeth Corrigan has been INTERVIEWED!!!

1.      What’s your name? Where can we find you? Blog? Twitter? Facebook?

I’m Elizabeth Corrigan! The best place to find me is on Facebook.

Twitter: @ERCorrigan


2.      Tell us a little about your life outside of the world of writing.

Well, I’m just coming out of NaNoWriMo, so I’m a little like, “What is life outside of writing?” 😉

By day I am an Army contractor. I’m a QA data analyst for a part of the Army that works on monitoring and preventing suicides and other behavioral health issues. By night, when I’m not writing, I’m usually playing games. I’m a huge fan of cooperative board games and tabletop role-playing games.

3.       How long have you been writing? What genres have you written? They don’t have to be published.

I wrote my first novel in high school. My friends all liked it, but in actuality, it was terrible. It was an over-dramatic contemporary young adult novel. My published novels are all fantasy novels—the first three books in the Earthbound Angels series and my mystery/fantasy Catching a Man. Last week I finished the first draft of my first science fiction novel, which I hope to publish next fall.

4.      What has been the greatest influence to your writing? Other authors, life experiences, etc…

My writing has so many influences, it’s hard to pick any as the “greatest.” Probably the thing that has sparked the most plots for me is my dreams. I can’t count how many times I’ve woken up from a vivid dream and thought, “That would be a great novel!” Sometimes it pans out and sometimes it does not.

My Earthbound Angels series is most influenced by the television show Supernatural and the Nightside books by Simon R. Green. Probably the biggest fiction influence on Catching a Man was the novel Poison Study by Maria V. Snyder. She wrote about a military dictatorship who were the good guys, and I wanted to do something just as different.

As for my writing structure, that has been influenced a lot by Red Adept Publishing/Editing. They’ve really helped me clean up my style.

5.      Are you currently writing anything now? If so tell us about it? If not make something up…

I just finished the first draft of a science fiction novel called Arachne’s Web. It’s a space opera about a group of characters who are suddenly having memories of past lives. One of its working titles is “Space Trains” because the primary method of traveling between moons is trains in space. And yes, one of the first scenes features two of the characters robbing the train.

Up next after that is the sequel to Catching a Man, because I’ve been putting that off for way too long.

6.      How do you typically begin your projects? Do you create outlines and character profiles or jump in head first with the initial idea? And do you focus on just one at a time?

I spent a lot of time planning books in my head before I write anything down. It’s something for my mind to do when I’m bored on a long car drive or I’m trying to fall asleep. At this point in time, I’m on-and-off working on about 6 series in my head. I generally do a brief outline, just a one-liner of what’s going to be in each chapter, before I start writing, and I find that my outlines change a lot as I write the novel.

7.      What aspect of your writing do you consider your strength? Your weakness?

I always say my strength is punchy dialogue. I like writing conversations between characters. People also tell me I’m good at having distinct voices for my characters. My weakness is descriptions. I don’t pay attention to them when I read, so I don’t bother putting them in my first drafts. I have whole scenes that have no real setting. So when I edit, I need to pay extra close attention to putting in that kind of detail.

8.      After publishing, the next trouble facing writers is marketing. What do you typically do when marketing your novel? Do you have tips you’d like to share?

Can I go back and make marketing my weakness on the above question? I’m definitely not great at it. I’m trying out some new things, though, that will hopefully work out. BookRazor is a great service that will help you find reviewers.

9.      What advice would you give a writer who is starting out?

If someone asks you to pay for their publishing service, they are not a real publisher! Read the Query Shark archives to learn how to query (and write book descriptions). Don’t believe people when they say you have to write for you—you can write for any reason you want. But you’ll probably be happiest if you’re writing for yourself.

The Stroke of Eleven

BOOK 1: The Beast of Talesend  by  Kyle Robert Shultz

BOOK 2: The Tomb of the Sea Witch

The Stroke of Eleven  description:

The adventures of Beaumont and Beasley are at an end.

The Council of Scions has finally caught up with Nick Beasley and his friends–and the sinister enchantress Madame Levesque has plans for them. Nick and Cordelia must solve an ancient mystery for her. Otherwise, Crispin and Molly will be lost forever.

The investigation leads Nick and Cordelia to the Castle of Basile, a bizarre place detached from space and time. Old friends are trapped there, and Nick and Cordelia are soon imprisoned along with them. Their jailer is the Fairy Godmother from the tale of Cinderella…who turns out to be far less benevolent than the storybook version.

A masked man offers to help–but can the White Rabbit really be trusted? What is Cinderella’s dark secret? And what will happen when the clock strikes twelve?

BOOK 3: The Stroke of Eleven   3 STARS

Like the other books, this was a new and rather dark twist on the fairy tales we know and love. After surviving on the run for so long, they’re finally captured. It’s interesting to be back dealing with the Council, as well as Nick’s dream Beast still coming in to play, and them finally questioning what really happened to Cordelia’s father. It helps to tie the stories together to develop this larger over arching plot, and not just a new case of the week. The building of the time loop, and how the world changes around them was fascinating, and practically apocalyptic. And while this is supposed to be about Cinderella’s real story, it was surprisingly more Beauty and the Beast than even the first book was. With the outfits, the song, and even living furniture making little debuts, which was rather charming. However, I found it ridiculous how the other magic users in the story kept ignoring Nick because he was just an ordinary guy, even if he is currently a beast. After all he’d done and the cases he’s solved, it felt like a rather strange turn of events to act like any idea he comes up with couldn’t possibly be worth their time. Also, while this story had so much to offer, and a lot of questions were answered, as well as plenty of plot lines that could build for more stories, it ultimately ended up being rather predictable. The “big reveals” were more of a confirmation of what you already knew. It was a good book, but just wasn’t on par with the previous stories. Even the whole sci-fi bit of Doctor Who style clockwork people and robots really tainted the normally magical aspect. Plus there were a lot of typos. It feels like Shultz may have rushed this story. I still do look forward to see what happens next, especially after that ending which really makes me wonder which Liddell was in that locked room.

The Last Days of Lady Cordelia

The Last Days of Lady Cordelia  by  Kyle Robert Schultz  description:

Lady Cordelia Beaumont is dying.

That’s what her mysterious nurse tells her, at least. Even worse, her magic powers have abandoned her, her friends are missing, and her whole world has completely changed. Everyone around her is insisting that magic and fairy tales aren’t real. Even the name of her city is different. She’s not in Talesend any more—she’s in a place called London.

Cordelia is determined to return to her own reality, but dark forces are working against her. An old friend may be able to help—but he doesn’t remember who she is.

Who are the Neverwolves? What is the secret of the Shadow Parallel? And how can Cordelia use magic to escape from a world where magic doesn’t exist?

BOOK 1: The Last Days of Lady Cordelia   4 STARS

Honestly this shouldn’t really be considered a series all on its’ own. It’s really just part of the regular Beaumont and Beasley series, like maybe BOOK 2.5, because it seems to pick up where The Tomb of the Sea Witch left off. Although it is taking place in a sort of other world, it wouldn’t really make sense without reading the other 2 books. However, it is a rather short story, but an interesting one that does promise a more intricate plot later on. I really loved the idea of the Neverwolves, and how this isn’t just some throwaway short story that can be easily done without. It’s a really good tale, and one that didn’t need to be a full book, but definitely makes me want more. The only thing is that it did need better editing. There were typos that could’ve been easily fixed with another read through. Regardless, worth the read and can’t wait for the next one.