Catching a Man

Catching a Man  by  Elizabeth Corrigan   description:

Kadin Stone’s life is finally going according to plan. She’s starting her new job as a homicide detective’s aide at one of the premier criminal investigation companies in Valeriel City, the capital of a 1950’s-style kingdom. Kadin is certain her new position will introduce her to any number of eligible men, so she’ll finally be able to get married and stop burdening the brother who insists on supporting her.

On Kadin’s first day, the royal family calls in her team to investigate the murder of gossip-rag cover girl Queen Callista. Kadin’s superiors think it’s an open and shut case. The queen’s jilted lover Duke Baurus DeValeriel had motive, means, and opportunity, but Kadin can’t help but spot holes in their theory.

After checking into a few leads of her own, Kadin inadvertently ends up in the confidence of Duke Baurus. When she tries to share what she knows with the rest of the team, she finds them unwilling to listen to the opinion of a girl who they know is only after a ring on her finger. In order to see justice served, Kadin finds herself doing the last thing she expected when she started working for a homicide detective—solve a murder!

BOOK 1: Catching a Man   5 STARS

I’ll admit, I went into this book thinking it’d be a fluff romance with a murder mystery in the background for a bit of plot. Instead it was an intense and very well developed mystery, that had twists you never saw coming, and an ending that left me completely surprised and yet the most logical. I loved that this was set in a 50’s style world, you get the clothes and the technology that is familiar to us for that era. Even the misogynistic views of women, where the only stable life for a girl is to find a man and get married while she’s still young and pretty. However, that is where the similarities to this world ends. Corrigan has built an entirely different society and government that vividly brought this world to life, and left so much to be discovered. I found it fascinating that here the medical field is run by the government, and so easily accessible to all, while investigations is the service you need insurance for. Meaning if a family member can’t afford or chooses not to pay for an investigation a criminal just goes free. Even the way women are rated, and what they go through to stay employed or to receive benefits, just shows how much thought Corrigan put into this. The mystery itself was also well calculated, and I loved how Kadin became a woman not just looking for a man, but one looking for justice. She was never the ditzy sort willing to do whatever to get married, she’s just a reasonable woman that understands the rules of this world, and doesn’t want to be a burden on her brother anymore. But more so, she’s clever and observant, and is willing to put her career and life in jeopardy in order to find the truth. Absolutely hoping there are more in this series to come, and it better come soon.

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Lily Luchesi has been INTERVIEWED!!!

1. What’s your name? Where can we find you? Blog? Twitter? Facebook?

Hi, I’m Lily Luchesi, and I’m the bestselling and award winning author of the Paranormal Detectives Series and other stories. You can find me via the following:
http://lilyluchesibooks.wix.com/lilyluchesi

http://amazon.com/author/lilyluchesi

http://facebook.com/lilyluchesi

http://twitter.com/LilyLuchesi

http://instagram.com/lilyluchesi

http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7369101.Lily_Luchesi

 

  1. Tell us a little about your life outside of the world of writing.

When I’m not writing, I’m mostly a homebody. I love to cook, read, watch TV, and listen to music. I’m also an avid fandom merch collector, especially Funko Pop dolls.

  1. How long have you been writing? What genres have you written? They don’t have to be published.

I’ve been writing professionally for two and a half years, and just released my eighth solo book, Never Again, which is a supernatural war thriller set between Israel in the 1500s and modern day, starring an immortal male siren as he fights against the demons the Nazis set upon the Jews.
I have written horror (paranormal and erotica). I love monsters, the creepier the better. But I make sure all my stories have a silver lining, usually a romantic subplot to give the reader hope amidst a lot of bloodshed. My Paranormal Detectives Series could also be considered a mystery series, as it follows a mortal detective and a vampire special agent as they search for various paranormal criminals.

  1. What has been the greatest influence to your writing? Other authors, life experiences, etc…

A prolonged exposure to the unnatural as a child. Growing up Catholic, I was immersed in spirituality from a young age. I was also exposed to ghosts and vampires and such as a toddler, and thanks to my mom leaving those old cartoons and black and white shows on, I found my love of the macabre and honed that in my writing.

  1. Are you currently writing anything now? If so tell us about it? If not make something up…

I just finished and published Never Again, as I previously mentioned. I am now in the editing stages of my March 7th release, The Coven Princess. It’s my first dive into YA, but it’s still paranormal/horror, featuring a young witch who was born with mixed Dark and Light blood, entering adulthood while a Dark magic war is brewing. It’s my longest book yet at 100k words, and I am so excited!

  1. How do you typically begin your projects? Do you create outlines and character profiles or jump in head first with the initial idea? And do you focus on just one at a time?

I just get ideas and jump right in. I find plotting ruins my creativity. I will work on two to three projects at a time, but mostly focus on one at a time so I can complete them sooner.

  1. What aspect of your writing do you consider your strength? Your weakness?

Good question. I think my strength is building realistic characters. All my women are independent, tough, intelligent in their own way. My men sometimes suffer from stubbornness, but they don’t succumb to toxic masculinity. That’s a big deal for me.
My weakness…I think too fast for my fingers to write or type. I often have to go back in the second draft and add detail.

  1. After publishing, the next trouble facing writers is marketing. What do you typically do when marketing your novel? Do you have tips you’d like to share?

Every author has something different that works. I am lucky to have a great publisher behind me (Vamptasy/CHBB Publishing) and they help me immensely. Having a core street team with ARC readers is a big help, too.

  1. What advice would you give a writer who is starting out?

Don’t get discouraged. There will always be rejections, bad reviews, authors who are more successful. Be your best, write the books you want to read, and your career will build itself.

 

Elizabeth Corrigan has been INTERVIEWED!!!

1.      What’s your name? Where can we find you? Blog? Twitter? Facebook?

I’m Elizabeth Corrigan! The best place to find me is on Facebook.

Twitter: @ERCorrigan

Website: www.elizabethrcorrigan.com

2.      Tell us a little about your life outside of the world of writing.

Well, I’m just coming out of NaNoWriMo, so I’m a little like, “What is life outside of writing?” 😉

By day I am an Army contractor. I’m a QA data analyst for a part of the Army that works on monitoring and preventing suicides and other behavioral health issues. By night, when I’m not writing, I’m usually playing games. I’m a huge fan of cooperative board games and tabletop role-playing games.

3.       How long have you been writing? What genres have you written? They don’t have to be published.

I wrote my first novel in high school. My friends all liked it, but in actuality, it was terrible. It was an over-dramatic contemporary young adult novel. My published novels are all fantasy novels—the first three books in the Earthbound Angels series and my mystery/fantasy Catching a Man. Last week I finished the first draft of my first science fiction novel, which I hope to publish next fall.

4.      What has been the greatest influence to your writing? Other authors, life experiences, etc…

My writing has so many influences, it’s hard to pick any as the “greatest.” Probably the thing that has sparked the most plots for me is my dreams. I can’t count how many times I’ve woken up from a vivid dream and thought, “That would be a great novel!” Sometimes it pans out and sometimes it does not.

My Earthbound Angels series is most influenced by the television show Supernatural and the Nightside books by Simon R. Green. Probably the biggest fiction influence on Catching a Man was the novel Poison Study by Maria V. Snyder. She wrote about a military dictatorship who were the good guys, and I wanted to do something just as different.

As for my writing structure, that has been influenced a lot by Red Adept Publishing/Editing. They’ve really helped me clean up my style.

5.      Are you currently writing anything now? If so tell us about it? If not make something up…

I just finished the first draft of a science fiction novel called Arachne’s Web. It’s a space opera about a group of characters who are suddenly having memories of past lives. One of its working titles is “Space Trains” because the primary method of traveling between moons is trains in space. And yes, one of the first scenes features two of the characters robbing the train.

Up next after that is the sequel to Catching a Man, because I’ve been putting that off for way too long.

6.      How do you typically begin your projects? Do you create outlines and character profiles or jump in head first with the initial idea? And do you focus on just one at a time?

I spent a lot of time planning books in my head before I write anything down. It’s something for my mind to do when I’m bored on a long car drive or I’m trying to fall asleep. At this point in time, I’m on-and-off working on about 6 series in my head. I generally do a brief outline, just a one-liner of what’s going to be in each chapter, before I start writing, and I find that my outlines change a lot as I write the novel.

7.      What aspect of your writing do you consider your strength? Your weakness?

I always say my strength is punchy dialogue. I like writing conversations between characters. People also tell me I’m good at having distinct voices for my characters. My weakness is descriptions. I don’t pay attention to them when I read, so I don’t bother putting them in my first drafts. I have whole scenes that have no real setting. So when I edit, I need to pay extra close attention to putting in that kind of detail.

8.      After publishing, the next trouble facing writers is marketing. What do you typically do when marketing your novel? Do you have tips you’d like to share?

Can I go back and make marketing my weakness on the above question? I’m definitely not great at it. I’m trying out some new things, though, that will hopefully work out. BookRazor is a great service that will help you find reviewers.

9.      What advice would you give a writer who is starting out?

If someone asks you to pay for their publishing service, they are not a real publisher! Read the Query Shark archives to learn how to query (and write book descriptions). Don’t believe people when they say you have to write for you—you can write for any reason you want. But you’ll probably be happiest if you’re writing for yourself.

Dirk Gently and Getting What You Deserve

This is no more a spoiler than a trailer for the next episode of Dirk Gently. Unless you haven’t finished season 1, in which case you may hesitate to read what I have to say.

The season 1 finale of Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency has everything falling apart for basically everyone who survived to the end of the season. One of the biggest things to happen, though, was that Todd Brotzman got Pararibulitis. This is a fictional nerve disease that causes hallucinations that feel real and causes an immense amount of pain for the person suffering from it. It’s a disease that runs in Todd’s family, in fact his sister Amanda already had it before he did. A lot of people have talked about this ending as seeing Todd getting the disease as punishment, namely because of the song that plays at the end. First Things First by Neon Trees.

You are never gonna get
Everything you want in this world
First things first
Get what you deserve

I mean someone gets a disease and then a song goes on to say “Get what you deserve” that definitely sounds like a punishment. But I don’t at all believe this was true. Even before seeing season 2, it just didn’t make sense. First off, it runs in his family, so the odds are he would get it eventually anyway. Secondly, he gets this after he’s righted all his wrong. By the end he has come clean and told the truth to Amanda about having previously faked having the disease to get money. He has saved the world and Lydia by stopping the soul swapping bad guys. He has even come to believe in Dirk and is choosing to follow him and help him solve future cases. Why, after everything, would he then be punished?

It is true that Todd himself sees it as a punishment, but as we go further into season 2 it’s obvious that it isn’t. If Todd didn’t have Pararibulitis then he wouldn’t have had that episode right in front of Sheriff Hobbs, who then wouldn’t have found the pill bottle left behind with his info, which then wouldn’t have led to Todd, Dirk, and Farah getting arrested. This is ultimately a good thing, because that keeps them in this town where the weird stuff starts happening, and it gives them a new set of people who are now willing to help, and not turn them in to Black Wing, who is hunting them.

If Todd didn’t have the disease he wouldn’t have had an episode at the same time as Amanda, who is now showing that the disease in connection with the Rowdy 3 actually gives her powers. Them both having an attack at the same time allows Todd to figure out where Amanda actually is.

Todd didn’t deserve to be punished. He deserved to have help, he deserved to find his sister, and he deserves to be part of the team that stops the terrible things that are happening in this town. Pararibulitis is making that happen. It’s all connected.

More than that though, in real world terms, when real diseases are contracted it’s hard to see the silver lining. Sometimes maybe there just isn’t one. But sometimes there is. I recently read an article about Michael J. Fox, and he talked about how he wasn’t exactly happy to have Parkinson’s disease, but that his having it has been a good thing. He’s been able to bring attention to the disease in ways others haven’t. He’s been able to help raise money and get awareness to where they’re working on a cure for it. Because of who he is, having this disease has brought about a lot of good.

Nobody wants something bad to happen to them. It’s hard to see how it could be good given that we call it “something bad”. But sometimes those bad things do actually happen so other good can come of it. Instead of looking at it as a punishment, maybe we should look at it as we deserve to have this obstacle to overcome so we can come out stronger and more capable than ever.

The Silkworm Book vs Show

Strike

After The Cuckoo’s Calling diverged from the book as much as it did, I really didn’t know what would become of The Silkworm, a book which was even better than the first. Upon hearing it would have only 2 episodes when at least Cuckoo had 3, my expectations dropped even further, for this book was far more complicated than the first. However, while it definitely doesn’t follow the first book from beginning to end in the same manner, it did keep the important parts and simply melded events into a more efficient manner. While Strike might have got different information from the same person at different times, they instead would have it happen in one conversation. And of course the things the characters would’ve simply have been thinking about and worried over are brought out in conversation in different ways, so that the viewers could get hints of the same issues the likes of Strike and Robin were dealing with.

Though I find it strange they still find a reason to do silly things like change names. Michael Fancourt from the book is now Andrew Fancourt in the show. I’d really like to know the logic behind such changes. Yet that’s a small complaint that can be overlooked, even if it’s strange. I think the most interesting part is how they did flashes of what one would be envisioning while reading Bombyx Mori, and if you recall what it was about you can imagine how disturbing it would be. But they did it in a way where you get the idea of how twisted the book is, while not overdoing it. Though they definitely didn’t shy away from the grisly murder scene.

It’s also a bit of a switch up how they’re making Matthew out to be so much more sympathetic and nice, when in the books he’s not exactly the best and often shows how little he thinks of her job and Cormoran. Of course if Galbraith goes against my wishes, and Robin and Matthew stay together, perhaps it’d be better to shine a good light on him. However, the biggest change there really was from book to show was the cutting out of characters like Pippa, which alters a lot of the story, and Nina, which wasn’t as big a deal. As well as diminishing Kathryn Kent’s role to barely a conversation. It makes it much less likely that you would get the little clues that lead to the killer. Even, if I’m being honest, I didn’t quite catch them until my second read through the book. So while I think the ending of the story does appear to come out of left field at you from the show’s point of view, altogether I think it was a much better representation of the book than the last episodes were.

The Cuckoo’s Calling Book vs Show

Strike

It’s no secret now that The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith is actually written by J.K. Rowling. Now anyone who read her Harry Potter books and then saw the movies know how well they were kept to the original novels, and so you might be surprised by how much is changed from the book to the TV show in this case. In some cases it makes sense to alter or cut certain scenes in order to get you the information you needed to follow this mystery, but not hear the same repeated information over and over. Also some things have to just be said since, obviously, we’re not in the characters mind like you are in the book. However, the fact that they made it into a TV show should’ve allowed them the ability and time to truly explore this mystery as it was meant to be. After all, a movie can reasonably only be so long, but a TV show can be rather long in length as well as have several episodes to continue the story.

Now there’s the fact that some have complained that the characters don’t quite look how they were described, but that’s not really something to worry about. Robin Ellacott, played by Holliday Grainger, is perhaps the best match there is out of the cast. Not only does she look as she was described in the story, the actress does a great job of getting across the barely contained excitement Robin felt at the opportunity to help a Private Detective actually solve a case. She’s fun and likeable, and does justice to the character. Oddly enough, they diminished her role in solving the case. Such as the fact she’s the one who figured out how to find Rochelle, rather than that scene of Cormoran stealing a file from a previous residence. Which also led to a rearranging of events that had him interviewing Rochelle before he went to Vashti, it’s no wonder she didn’t stick around for questioning, he wouldn’t even have known the right questions to ask. Which is further kerfuffled by the fact they completely leave off his main line of questioning, what was the blue paper Lula was seen with the day she died?

Speaking of which, Tom Burke, as Cormoran Strike, was a casting I wasn’t too happy about when I first heard of it. He’s not the looming giant that takes up too much space and has not too attractively described facial features topped with hair that was likened to pubes. However, Burke does a good job of coming across with a gruff demeanor that’s softened by the few self deprecating smiles. He makes you believe that he has a prosthetic leg in his movements, something they rather flaunt, which is as it should be considering it is an obstacle for him at times in cases where he might attempt to follow someone, or even just struggle to make it up stairs. Altogether his acting has brought the character to life. My one complaint really is that he does on occasion mumble so that it’s hard to understand what he’s saying. Regardless, the two main characters, and perhaps the most important considering they’re the ones that’ll keep popping up, do well. And luckily they didn’t feel the need to add any romance that wasn’t there in the book, and kept their relationship very professional, which is one of the things that I do so love about this duo.

The rest aren’t exactly too far off their marks, at least not enough to really change anything. Though strangely they renamed Kieran Klovas-Jones to Nico, even while they kept his story exactly the same. Then there is Lula’s boyfriend, Evan Duffield, who in no way looks the part of a pretty boy. Once again, his part is so small as to not really detract from the show itself.

However, I was surprised that some characters were cut. Those like John Bristow’s girlfriend, Alison, and DI Carver don’t really make much of a difference to the plot and it’s reasonable to cut characters like that so you don’t have too many cluttering up the show. After all a book has plenty of time to delve into a variety of characters, while a total of 3 hours of TV really don’t. Yet in the case of combining characters like with the actual woman Tony Landry was having an affair with and Tansy, it does cause a bit of an upset to the story for a number of reasons. Such as how Cormoran comes to discover some info and what really is going on in Tansy’s life. As well as they made Guy Some come off as playing the gruff and rude demeanor that was really more of how Freddie Bestigui was set up, especially with how they ended up being able to talk to Guy Some. Once more it was an unnecessary change, and greatly altered the story.

While it’s not a bad thing to not necessarily know exactly what will happen next when it comes to a murder mystery, it does feel like this show hasn’t quite done the best it could to live up to the core of what really made the novel so wonderful. It felt rushed through, and at times it was as if they were just jamming the few characters they kept into random places to help make sense of the story that they’d chopped up and simplified perhaps too much. No there’s no need to have a similar conversation with one character to enforce facts that another character has already given us just to keep true to the book, but in a way they let characters give too much straightforward info that took away a lot of the ingenuity that makes Cormoran Strike such a wonderful detective, because of the truth that he’s able to dig out of the scattered and broken facts he’s given.

On its own it’s not a bad show as many a reviewer has established. I enjoyed it, and I’ll definitely watch whatever more is to come. However, in comparison with the book, it comes up a bit short, and that saddens me.

Palm Beach Bones RELEASE BLITZ!!!

Detective Charlie Crawford is having a tough week. First, Palm Beach’s ex-police chief washes up dead on the beach behind The Breakers. Then Charlie’s friend’s niece is abducted without a trace. As if that wasn’t bad enough, his brother just checked himself into a clinic for depression and alcoholism.

The good news is Charlie’s love life has never been better…except with the woman he really loves.

 

 

 

 

Buy Links:

Amazon http://amzn.to/2qK6uEu

Amazon CA http://amzn.to/2qFq8q4

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2ror9jA

 

Also Available Books 1-3 in the Charlie Crawford series, all books can be read as stand-alone

Palm Beach Nasty

Amazon http://amzn.to/2kRvlEE

Amazon CA http://amzn.to/2kqLRyd

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2kRgD3S

 

Palm Beach Poison

Amazon http://amzn.to/2jvF1Yv

Amazon CA http://amzn.to/2kRtOOY

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2kRyNz9

 

Palm Beach Deadly

Amazon http://amzn.to/2kqRP1R

Amazon CA http://amzn.to/2jUQcGo

Amazon UK http://amzn.to/2jCW3iq

 

About the Author

A native New Englander, Tom dropped out of college and ran a Vermont bar—straight into the ground. After limping back to college to get his diploma, Tom became an advertising copywriter, first in Boston then New York. After ten years of post-Mad Men life, he made a radical change and got a job in Manhattan commercial real estate. Not long after that he ended up in Palm Beach, buying, renovating and selling houses while collecting a lot of raw material for his novels. On the side, he wrote Palm Beach Nasty and a screenplay called Dead in the Water. While at a wedding a few years back, he fell for the charm of Charleston, South Carolina. He moved there and wrote Palm Beach Poison and a series set in Charleston. Recently, wandering Tom moved again. This time, just down the road to Skidaway Island, outside of Savannah, where he just completed Palm Beach Deadly.

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The Beast of Talesend

The Beast of Talesend  by  Kyle Robert Shultz  description:

Private eye Nick Beasley lives in a world where fairy tales ended a long time ago – where zeppelins now soar the skies instead of dragons, and where the first automobiles have taken the place of flying carpets. He’s made a name for himself across the Afterlands by debunking fake magicians and exposing fraudulent monsters. This is the modern age, after all. Magic and monsters are long gone.

At least, that’s what Nick believes. Until he gets magically transformed into a monster, that is.

The only person who may be able to help Nick is Lady Cordelia Beaumont, one of the last enchantresses in the Afterlands. But in order for her to cure him, they’ll have to retrieve a powerful artifact from a ruthless crime lord – who is also Cordelia’s father.

The fate of the Afterlands lies in the hands of a runaway enchantress and a monstrous ex-detective. What could possibly go wrong?

BOOK 1: The Beast of Talesend  4 STARS

This is like a hard boiled detective got tossed into the darkest and bloodest of the Brothers Grimm fairy tales, then made it darker and more horrifying, and then someone decided it should be a comedy. Surprisingly it works. Honestly the twists Shultz has taken on the fairy tales was rather surprising and far different than anything I’ve read before, and I’ve read my fair share of retellings. I would love it if he would go back and write books on the stories they talk about in here as their history. Because while this is obviously a Beauty and the Beast retelling, since it’s a land of fairy tales, they’re all mixed in in varying ways, and the truth about Snow White honestly made a lot more sense than a lot of the other reasons for why the step mom would want her heart. Like I said, it’s dark, but the humor brought to it by the characters going through this, and Nick and Cordelia’s banter help really lighten it over all, even while they’re fighting evil and saving the world from darkness and destruction. Though it did start out a bit overly goofy in the beginning, once you really get into it, the tale does find a good balance and you get taken on quite an adventure. I even rather enjoyed Crispin’s involvement, as Nick’s little brother, there’s a lot going on there that I’d love to see developed and to find out more about their past. But it was the last line of this book that sealed the deal on me snatching up the next as soon as I can. I don’t want to spoil it, but I liked how Shultz got there and then left you hanging with that OMG moment. There’s just so many ways this series can go from here, and I look forward to the journey ahead.

Meddling with Murder

BOOK 1: Looking for La La by  Ellie Campbell

BOOK 2: To Catch a Creeper

Meddling with Murder   description:

Crouch End Confidential, the agency started by housewife, Cathy O’Farrell, with ex-cleaner Pimple, is failing badly. Hardly surprising when their only clients are little old ladies seeking lost pets. Until the strange case of the missing dog…

Soon Cathy’s multiple problems include stolen bikes, a possible murder weapon, the sabotage of her friends’ new shop, drug-dealing yobbos targeting her children’s primary school and being forced to pose as the world’s most inept maths tutor. Worse, best friend Rosa hires her to investigate fiancé Alec and – horrors – Cathy’s husband Declan is intent on moving himself, Cathy and kids to the safer climes of rural Norfolk. Suddenly Cathy is endangering her marriage, friendships and her life to untangle these messes. But that’s what you get for meddling with murder…

JacketBOOK 3: Meddling with Murder   5 STARS

This series just keep getting better and better. This is really the story it’s all been building up to. Cathy is finally a sort of real detective along with Pimple (can’t believe they’re still calling her that). With her new agency up and running, and her seeking to help people, it begins with one mystery after the next that all become entangled and really lead to a great story. Campbell did a great job of leaving little hints and clues that really add up, even if being from America the whole freak out over the gun thing really cracked me up. Oh us silly gun crazy Americans. Plus now all Cathy’s lying finally has a purpose, and she surprisingly does a good job of being confidential, even when it leads to a lot of misunderstandings. Very hilarious misunderstandings. But of course there’s more than just solving the case Cathy is working on, all her friends are up to something, many changing their lives, inspired by Cathy’s own bravery to chase her dreams. Plus Rosa being secretive and wondering about Alec, who is acting even more sneaky. And I must say that I love how Cathy and Declan are together, how no matter what craziness the other is going through they ultimately just want each other to be happy and it’s rather sweet. So much to enjoy and discover it was a great read, and I definitely hope there is more to come.

Columbo: The Glitter Murder

BOOK 4:  The Game Show Killer  by William Harrington

The Glitter Murder   description:

It seems obvious that famous motion-picture director Gunnar Sven was murdered during the course of a break-in robbery. Obvious to everyone that is, but Lieutenant Columbo, who always innocently asks “just one more little question.” Impervious to the dazzling lights of Hollywood, and the whims of its stars, Columbo methodically unravels the devious truth behind…The Glitter Murder.

glitterBOOK 5: The Glitter Murder   4 STARS

Okay, so it was probably a bad idea not to start with book one, because, while it didn’t at all make it hard to understand this mystery or what was going on, they do reference old cases and it’d just be nice to be in on the idea of it. But I didn’t take a way a star for that because that was my own fault. No, my only problem is right there in the beginning it has Ai-ling’s family history rushed through in one paragraph that actually made it hard to try and figure out who this book is centered around, and as it continued it felt like information was just given off in a list to try and shove it out right quick. Which was made even more unnecessary because that same information was actually worked into the story line in a more useful manner later on. But after the first couple of pages it gets back to the good writing I loved so much in the last book, and in many ways this one was actually a better plot line, because it didn’t just revolve around a single murder. Instead there’s a lot of crime going on, and people guilty of several different things that are dragged in because of this murder. And once more, I love that it isn’t a who-done-it, because we get to see Ai-ling’s struggle to keep her story straight, and fear of getting caught. Plus seeing the sides of the other people wondering who did kill Gunnar, and hoping they won’t be blamed for it just makes it so intense and captivating that I didn’t want to put it down. Plus, just getting to hear Columbo ask one more question makes reading these books worthwhile. I only hate that there’s just 6 of them.